MENU
Welcome to Alnylam

Welcome to Alnylam

Alnylam is developing an entirely new class of medicines based on the breakthrough discovery in biology known as RNA interference, or RNAi. Alnylam believes that RNAi therapeutics are a promising approach to silence disease-causing genes, and represent an opportunity to transform the treatment of many diseases.

Behind the Mystery: Rare + Genetic Series - TTR Amyloid

Behind the Mystery: Rare & Genetic Series - TTR Amyloid

Battling a rare medical condition, that's often misdiagnosed.
Imagine having a rare, debilitating disease that's passed down through families. Dr. John Berk, Associate Professor of Medicine at Boston University and Clinical Director of its Amyloidosis Center, joins us to discuss the medical condition called Transthyretin-Mediated Amyloidosis. It's symptoms are similar to other conditions and ATTR patients are very often misdiagnosed. We discuss symptoms, family connections and treatment options, in this Behind the Mystery: Rare & Genetic segment. And meet Dylan Duncan, who's battling the disease. You don't want to miss this.

Positive Data with Monthly Dosing Cohorts from Ongoing Phase 1 Trial with Fitusiran (ALN-AT3) for the Treatment of Hemophilia and Rare Bleeding Disorders

Positive Data with Monthly Dosing Cohorts from Ongoing Phase 1 Trial with Fitusiran (ALN-AT3) for the Treatment of Hemophilia and Rare Bleeding Disorders

We reported new data from our Phase 1 study with the newly named fitusiran (ALN-AT3), an investigational RNAi therapeutic targeting antithrombin (AT) for the treatment of hemophilia and rare bleeding disorders. Interim results – presented at the American Society of Hematology (ASH) 2015 Annual Meeting, held December 5 – 8, 2015 – showed that monthly, subcutaneous administration of fitusiran achieved potent and dose-dependent lowering of AT of up to 88% in patients with hemophilia. This AT lowering was associated with statistically significant increases in thrombin generation and an 85% reduction in estimated median annualized bleeding rates (ABR) in all evaluable cohorts. The observed bleeding rates are comparable to those reported for prophylactic intravenous infusions of replacement factors in patients with hemophilia. Fitusiran was found to be generally well tolerated to date, including no thromboembolic events or clinically significant increases in D-dimer, a biomarker of excessive clot formation.



Read More

Positive Interim Results from Phase 1/2 Clinical Study with ALN-CC5 for the Treatment of Complement-Mediated Diseases

Positive Interim Results from Phase 1/2 Clinical Study with ALN-CC5 for the Treatment of Complement-Mediated Diseases

We reported new data from our ongoing Phase 1/2 clinical study with ALN-CC5, an investigational RNAi therapeutic targeting complement component C5 for the treatment of complement-mediated diseases. Data were presented at the American Society of Hematology (ASH) 2015 Annual Meeting, held December 5 – 8, 2015.  Results showed that administration of ALN-CC5 achieved up to 99% knockdown of serum C5 and up to 98% inhibition of serum hemolytic activity, an assay for complement activity.  Further, ALN-CC5 administration resulted in low levels of residual C5, which – based on comparisons from separate studies – were at or below the estimated levels of free C5 observed at therapeutic doses of eculizumab, an approved anti-C5 monoclonal antibody. The effects were also found to be highly durable, with C5 knockdown and complement inhibition results supporting a once monthly and possibly a once quarterly subcutaneous dose regimen.  Importantly, ALN-CC5 was shown to be generally well tolerated, with no clinically significant, drug-related adverse events to date.




Read More

Pre-Clinical Results from ALN-HBV for the Treatment of Hepatitis B Virus Infection

Pre-Clinical Results from ALN-HBV for the Treatment of Hepatitis B Virus Infection

We presented new pre-clinical data with ALN-HBV, an investigational RNAi therapeutic targeting the Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) genome for the treatment of HBV infection. The ALN-HBV siRNA targets a highly conserved site across genotypes A-J, mapping to the X open reading frame, which is downstream from the most prevalent integration hotspot targeted by siRNAs from other developers. ALN-HBV is thus expected to achieve potent knockdown of HBV surface antigen (HBsAg) expressed by both covalently closed circular DNA (cccDNA) and integrated HBV DNA. Pre-clinical study results in rodent HBV models showed that subcutaneous administration of ALN-HBV led to potent and durable knockdown of HBsAg. Single doses of ALN-HBV in mice resulted in an up to 3.6 log10 and a mean of 1.6 log10 reduction of HBsAg 15 days after a single dose. Further, multiple doses of ALN-HBV in rats showed highly durable knockdown, with effects lasting up to 4 months following three weekly doses of ALN-HBV at 3 mg/kg. In addition, ALN-HBV was generally well tolerated in all rodent models.


Read More

New Clinical Data from Phase 1 Trial with ALN-PCSsc Confirms Potential for Bi-Annual Dosing

New Clinical Data from Phase 1 Trial with ALN-PCSsc Confirms Potential for Bi-Annual Dosing

Alnylam and The Medicines Company reported updated positive results from the ongoing Phase 1 clinical trial with ALN-PCSsc, an investigational RNAi therapeutic targeting PCSK9 for the treatment of hypercholesterolemia.  We had previously reported that subcutaneous administration of ALN-PCSsc resulted in an up to 83 percent lowering of LDL-C, with an up to 64 ± 5 percent mean maximum reduction. In new results, the effects of ALN-PCSsc were also found to be highly durable, with clinically significant and clamped reductions in LDL-C that now confirm the potential for a bi-annual subcutaneous dose regimen. An up to 53 percent maximal and 47 percent least squares mean reduction in LDL-C was achieved at day 180 after a single, low volume injection. In addition, ALN-PCSsc was shown to reduce a number of atherogenic lipids, including lipoprotein (a), and total cholesterol, which are associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Importantly, ALN-PCSsc was generally well tolerated with no clinically significant drug-related adverse events to date.



Read More